College of Arts and Science the Department of Mathematics and Statistics http://www.usask.ca/

Welcome to the Math Placement Test

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics has developed an on-line Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) that is specifically designed to assess competency on precalculus mathematics, and to determine whether the student has the necessary prerequisites for succeeding in University calculus courses. The test consists of thirty multiple-choice questions to be completed in 70 minutes, precisely timed by the computer. It is closed-book and closed-notes, and calculators are not allowed.

     Students who are registered in Math 110/121/123/125/176 are required to write the MPT. Students who skip the MPT without explicit permission from the Department Head of Math & Stats may be dropped from the course or have their calculus grade withheld. This has been a mandatory assessment for Math 110/121/123/125 (which are introductory calculus courses) since 2007 and for Math 176 (Advanced Calculus I) since 2018.

     The topics covered on the MPT are:

Students who wish to review concepts and practise the various mathematical techniques that the actual test will focus on may visit the following site to take a sample test:

       Sample Math Placement Test


Instructions for students registered in 2018 Intersession (2018 May 9th-Aug 14th) are here.

Instructions for students registered in 2018 Fall Term (Sep-Dec) & 2019 Winter Term (Jan-Apr) are here (August and September test dates announced).


Frequently Asked Questions & Further Enquiries: The following document contains answers to many Frequently Asked Questions. If you still have unanswered questions after reading those Q&As, send email to "mpt _at_math.usask.ca" with the subject line "Math Placement Test Enquiry" (replacing "_at_" with "@"), and please indicate which course you are enrolled in or wish to enroll in (Math 110/121/123/125/176) and which term it is (e.g., ♪ Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall ♪).


This page was last updated on: 2018 July 27.
Copyright © 2007 University of Saskatchewan.